Bunny Visit

On a recent morning, as I was lifting the window blinds, I saw a tiny bunny munching on grass in my front yard. What a sweet surprise! It looked very small and seemed completely at ease.

I do occasionally see them around, cottontail rabbits, but not often in my yard. Once in a while one shows up on my camera trap that is set up in the back.

Cottontails are common throughout North, Central and South America. If you want to get uber scientific, there are many subgenera, such as Eastern cottontail, desert cottontail, mountain cottontail and swamp rabbit. Most have the little white fluff that gives them their name.

Females can have up to three litters a year, with an average of four young. they grow quickly and are considered full grown at three months! They live in burrows and are quite sociable with others in their group.

The life of these cuddly creatures is short though, averaging two years. They are appealing to many predators, including birds of prey, foxes, coyotes, cougars, dogs, cats, snakes and even squirrels!

I was able to get some good photos of my visitor before she or he left.

Squirrel streak

Published by

Joan E. Miller

I live in the amazing Pacific Northwest. I'm a writer, photographer, birder, nature lover. I'm also a gardener, of food, flowers and shrubs.

11 thoughts on “Bunny Visit”

  1. Lovely post – warm and friendly. And nice photos. Getting technical, what camera/lens did you use?

    I wonder how and when rabbits arrived in the USA? I know they were brought to Britain by the Romans, or that’s the story.

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    1. Thank you, David! I used a Nikon Coolpix B700, “bridge” camera. I don’t know about rabbits in the U.S. We do have native jackrabbits, and I suppose they are native to this land. But not sure about cottontails.

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      1. I think jackrabbits are what we call hares – bigger than rabbits, long ears – live, nest, and rest above ground in shallow depressions where they lay flat out. Is that jackrabbit behaviour?

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      2. David, I’m no expert, but I believe our desert jackrabbits are very large and have huge ears. I didn’t know jackrabbits lived anywhere else, but they do! You’d have to compare your hares to ours.

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  2. Great that you were able to get so many closeup shots, Joan. I’d say that their coat is longer and ears shorter than the Cottontails I have running around my modest Virginia estate…

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  3. Lucky you to have such a lovely visitor, Joan!

    I didn’t know about the varieties of cottontails, nor that they are considered grown at three months and even squirrels predate them – so thanks for including such interesting facts.

    Sweetie photos too, I particularly like the dewy-eyed close-up in the penultimate photo. What a beautiful animal… 🌺

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    1. Thanks! Yes, they are cute and plentiful. I’m sure I’ve missed times when they were in the yard. They are pretty small.

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